Domestic Violence Advocate, Social Activist, Consultant & Entertainment Producer

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Domestic Violence in the African-American and Asian Communities

By Lyn Twyman

Written for a magazine debuting for Blasians

Domestic violence is a social pandemic that has no color barriers.  Every race, nation, society and culture experiences it.  No one is immune from knowing someone who has been affected by it.  Unfortunately, domestic violence is more prevalent in some cultures than others.  By comparison, U.S. statistics show that African-Americans have higher reported incidences of domestic violence than Asians.  According to a study released this year titled “Nearly Four Million California Adults Are Victims of Intimate Partner Violence“, in California alone, African Americans experienced the highest number of intimate partner violence since turning age 18 at a rate of 30.6 percent.  This number was recorded for a 12 month span from April 2010 and preceding.  In the same study, the Asian community had a reported rate of 23.4%.  According to these numbers, it does not mean that domestic violence occurs less necessarily, but what this does mean is Asians are less likely to report abuse and one reason for this is societal factors.

I am a bi-racial American; my mother is Filipino and my father is black.  Unfortunately, I grew up experiencing domestic violence in the home.  After years of research of my family history, background, understanding more about both cultures and a little bit of therapy, I came to the same conclusion that the way we view and treat domestic violence is often a culturally based experience.  How else could I explain that my mother, a young, college educated Filipina could subject herself to psychological and financial abuse by a man who only had a GED and a few years in the military?  Myths surrounding domestic violence say that people who are educated wouldn’t become victims of domestic violence but countless stories of people with plenty of education, fame, and money  have proved the opposite.

Understanding who you and I are as blacks, African-Americans, Africans or Asians and how we relate to domestic violence is extremely important because so much of how we naturally view the world around us, even when it comes to dealing with abuse, is rooted in our culture.  The culture of African-Americans is rooted in the days of slavery, in Africans and other African-American ancestors, as most do not know what tribes we descended from.  As painful as the past of our ancestors is, this is a part of our cultural history and it was a highly impactful one, even for Africans that endured colonization in their own homelands.  Historically, blacks have been stripped from their tribes, clans, their communities then molded into someone’s else culture only to be defamed, deprived,  stripped, beaten, raped or killed.  Families were broken apart and women and children were used as commodities.

Then our ancestors transcended into eras such as Civil Rights (1955 – 1968) and South African Apartheid (1948 -1994) and we see yet another generation of blacks, African-Americans and Africans who had yet to contend with more hostility and the breakdown of families and self worth, the core of any healthy society.  The end of both violent and degrading eras still did not quail the number of fatherless homes, or reverse the affects from governmental atrocities that frivolously imprisoned black men for looking at white women.  The end to these eras did not reverse the effects of those who were chastised for stepping foot in  “Whites Only” establishments or the harsh sentencing that was handed down for stealing something as simple as a loaf of bread to feed ones family.

So when we look at the alarmingly high number of domestic violence incidences within the Black community, we may often wonder ‘Why’, even though most Black communities are considered the minority around the world.  In part, it is due to the residual effects from the years of historical oppression from institutionalized racism, and note I said residual effects.  Low income, unemployment, inadequate education and urban over-crowding are all factors that correlate to higher incidences of domestic violence (Ref. Encyclopedia of Domestic Violence).  Lack of money, resources and education have all been contributing factors that has affected our communities for generations.  In other words, the generational hostility, aggression, lack of healthy support systems and limited access to mental health services resulting from years of injustice has lent to the violence and this cannot be ignored.

The Asian culture, on the other hand, has strong patriarchal values and emphasizes the obedience of girls and women which contributes to a different dynamic of domestic violence.  A sense of family honor is something taught from an early age and to speak ill of one’s family is often considered a disgrace.  Thus, we see less reported incidences of domestic violence in Asian communities.  Psychological abuse is heavily carried out.  Physical punishment is often viewed as deserved or warranted under most circumstances between husbands toward their wives.   It often seems that it takes severe and multiple counts of punishment before it is finally declared abuse in many Asian cultures.

Domestic violence isoften seen as a “family matter” in Asian culture.  Additionally, Asians have been very accustomed to strong religious influences like Confucius, Hinduism, Buddhism and even Catholicism that emphasizes emotional control and duty, thus resulting in little recognition of psychological abuse when it is present.  The factors mentioned all contribute to why Asians are less likely to report abuse.

Unlike the California report on African-Americans and domestic violence that looked at reports within the State,  41 – 61% of Asian women report experiencing physical and/or sexual violence by an intimate partner during their lifetime.1 This is higher than the rates in a national study reported by Whites (21.3%), African Americans (26.3%), Hispanics of any race (21.2%), people of mixed race (27.0%), and American Indians and Alaskan Natives (30.7%), and Asians and Pacific Islanders (12.8%).2   This goes back to my point that Asians are less likely to report abuse so numbers could very well be skewed in some instances.

In no way am I excusing domestic violence but I do believe that we must understand how blacks and Asians view domestic violence and the psychology behind those views in an effort to better help our communities.  More importantly, we must address this issue in a proper, tactful way with family and friends, perhaps even helping us gain more understanding if we are the ones being abused.  Understanding our culture is especially important if we are to properly advocate for immigrants who are new to our perspective countries.  If we fail to understand these historical and cultural factors of which we are as a society, why he/she hits or why he/she remains silent and stays in a relationship with abuse, then victims will continue to not receive the proper help they deserve and live safer, healthier lives.

If you find yourself in a situation where there is domestic violence, please contact your local domestic violence organization or call The National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1.800.799.SAFE (7233) 1.800.787.3224 (TTY).  You can also visit the Hot Peach Pages at http://www.hotpeachpages.net/index.html to find more information for your perspective country.

——————–

  1. The low end of the range is from a study by A. Raj and J. Silverman, Intimate partner violence against South-Asian women in Greater Boston Journal of the American Medical Women’s Association. 2002; 57(2): 111-114. The high end of the range is from a study by M. Yoshihama, Domestic violence against women of Japanese descent in Los Angeles: Two methods of estimating prevalence. Violence Against Women. 1999; 5(8):869-897.
  2. Tjaden P, Thoennes N. Extent, Nature, and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence: Research Report. Washington, DC: National Institute of Justice and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2000.

Lyn Twyman is an advocate, activist, consultant, radio personality, entertainment producer and founder of CourageNewtork.com, an online community and resource for domestic violence.  Lyn is also a first generation Asian and African-American.  She grew up with the many facets that come with being a bi-racial individual in America.  She also grew up watching all forms of abuse in the lives of her parents.  As a survivor of child abuse and intimate partner violence she chose to break the cycle of violence within her own family and families across the country.  Lyn is passionate about ending domestic violence, awareness for its root causes, prevention, family issues and diversity.  For more information about Lyn, please visit www.lyntwyman and also visit www.couragenetwork.com.

Revised 9-9-2015

Part 2: A Look At Wrongful Convictions: Courage Empowerment Forum Welcomes Johnnie Lee Savory

PART 2 FEATURING THE MUSIC OF VARIOUS ARTISTS

We heard from Johnnie in our Part 1 interview last week of Courage Empowerment Forum.  Get ready for Part 2 and learn more about the life of this survivor.

“Injustice is not about color, it’s about people who sit in office that don’t care.” – Johnnie Lee Savory

 

It was early 1977 when the life of a 14 year old was turned completely upside down. There was a double murder and investigators dragged the 14 year old Johnnie Lee Savory into an absolute nightmare. There were witnesses and evidence proving that Johnnie was not the murderer of his friend and friend’s sister but it was not enough to stop his 50 – 100 year original prison sentence. Johnnie would end up spending 30 years of his life behind bars for a crime he did not commit. Furthermore, the State of Illinois has denied multiple requests for DNA testing of evidence that would exonerate Johnnie.

According to The Innocence Project, there have been 273 post-conviction DNA exonerations in the United States. According to the same organization, DNA tests prove that nine Chicago teenagers were convicted in the 1990s of murders they did not commit. Five of them are still behind bars but prosecutors are refusing to acknowledge their innocence.

Johnnie’s plight is the plight of thousands more across our country, lives held captive behind bars because of a criminal justice system that fails to be just. Out of his experience, Johnnie has taken his pain and dedicated his life to helping those who are wrongfully convicted.

Tune in Tuesday, August 23th at 9 PM Eastern, 6pm Pacific to www.party934.com, 94.9 FM Hudson Valley, NY to hear Johnnie Lee Savory, wrongful conviction advocate and information specialist to Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, Sr.

Visit Johnnie’s site at www.thesavoryfiles.com and also visit www.law.northwestern.edu/cwc/newsandevents/Savory.html

You can listen to previous broadcasts of Courage Empowerment Forum by, visitingwww.courageempowermentforum.com

Join Courage Empowerment Forum on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Courage-Empowerment-Forum-Party934-Radio/189361497744391?v=wall

also on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/courageempower

A Look At Wrongful Convictions: Courage Empowerment Forum Welcomes Johnnie Lee Savory

FEATURING THE MUSIC OF VARIOUS ARTISTS

It was early 1977 when the life of a 14 year old was turned completely upside down. There was a double murder and investigators dragged the 14 year old Johnnie Lee Savory into an absolute nightmare. There were witnesses and evidence proving that Johnnie was not the murderer of his friend and friend’s sister but it was not enough to stop his 50 – 100 year original prison sentence. Johnnie would end up spending 30 years of his life behind bars for a crime he did not commit. Furthermore, the State of Illinois has denied multiple requests for DNA testing of evidence that would exonerate Johnnie.

According to The Innocence Project, there have been 273 post-conviction DNA exonerations in the United States. According to the same organization, DNA tests prove that nine Chicago teenagers were convicted in the 1990s of murders they did not commit. Five of them are still behind bars but prosecutors are refusing to acknowledge their innocence.

Johnnie’s plight is the plight of thousands more across our country, lives held captive behind bars because of a criminal justice system that fails to be just. Out of his experience, Johnnie has taken his pain and dedicated his life to helping those who are wrongfully convicted.

Tune in Tuesday, August 16th at 9 PM Eastern, 6pm Pacific to www.party934.com, 94.9 FM Hudson Valley, NY to hear Johnnie Lee Savory, wrongful conviction advocate and information specialist to Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, Sr.

Visit Johnnie’s site at www.thesavoryfiles.com and also visit www.law.northwestern.edu/cwc/newsandevents/Savory.html

www.lifeafterbirthbook.com.

You can listen to previous broadcasts of Courage Empowerment Forum by, visitingwww.courageempowermentforum.com

Join Courage Empowerment Forum on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Courage-Empowerment-Forum-Party934-Radio/189361497744391?v=wall

also on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/courageempower

The Victory of a Former Teenage Mom: Courage Empowerment Forum Welcomes Author and Youth Mentor Summer Owens

 FEATURING THE MUSIC OF VARIOUS ARTISTS

About sixteen years ago, at the age of 15, Summer was just another “statistic”. Now sixteen years later, she is a woman who has beaten the odds. Teenage moms makes up about 11% of all births in the United States and many do not finish school. Summer Owens is the author of Life After Birth: A Memoir of Survival and Success as a Teenage Mother, a personal story of her journey surviving and triumphing as a young mother, with tons of lessons and practical applications.

Although Summer was a teenage mother, there was something about her pregnancy that was atypical, and the assault on her life that caused her pregnancy left her frightened, embarrassed, ashamed and immensely confused. But as an over comer, Summer has chosen to take her experience and candidly reveal her life successfully to help all teenage moms.

A busy mom and a college graduate with two degrees herself, Summer is unstoppable. She is also a young woman’s mentor in her local community and travels around the country speaking to crowds about how to affectively help teenage moms.

Tune in Tuesday, July 26th at 9 PM Eastern, 6pm Pacific to www.party934.com, 94.9 FM Hudson Valley, NY to hear Summer Owens, youth mentor and author of Life After Birth: A Memoir of Survival and Success as a Teenage Mother .

Visit Sophia’s site at www.lifeafterbirthbook.com.

You can listen to previous broadcasts of Courage Empowerment Forum by, visitingwww.courageempowermentforum.com

Join Courage Empowerment Forum on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Courage-Empowerment-Forum-Party934-Radio/189361497744391?v=wall

also on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/courageempower

One Woman’s Triumph: Courage Empowerment Forum Welcomes Sexual Assault Advocate and Author Sophia A. Strother

FEATURING THE MUSIC OF VARIOUS ARTISTS

“By the age of sixteen I felt like a washed up rag. I felt like – what else!” Those are the words of Sophia A. Strother quoted from her book Sophia I’m Back! Her young life was not only hard, it was tragic, having to suffer indescribable torment by a sexually abusive father and subsequent rapes by three men. She later became pregnant at 15 but not withstanding other struggles. Sophia’s life appeared to be wrecked and ruined but through her faith, it never succumbed to that devastation.

Now she is the founder of Empowerment Driven by Knowledge Coalition, an organization whose mission is to empower others to survive and overcome. Sophia is also the CEO of Trustworthy Consulting. An inspirational and motivational speaker and consultant, Sophia works alongside Martin Luther King III and many other well known names for the embetterment of people through community based programs and events.

Tune in Tuesday, July 19th at 9 PM Eastern, 6pm Pacific to www.party934.com, 94.9 FM Hudson Valley, NY to hear sexual assault advocate and author of Sophia I’m Back! Sophia A. Strother, and learn more about her amazing journey from survivor to thriver.

Visit Sophia’s site at www.trustworthyconsult.com.

You can listen to previous broadcasts of Courage Empowerment Forum by, visitingwww.courageempowermentforum.com

Join Courage Empowerment Forum on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Courage-Empowerment-Forum-Party934-Radio/189361497744391?v=wall

also on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/courageempower

The Danger of Those with a History of Violence: Courage Empowerment Forum Welcomes Executive Director of the National Domestic Violence Registry Myra Spearman

FEATURING THE MUSIC OF ELIANE AMHERD

Myra Spearman was in her early 20’s when she first got married. Like countless women and men around the country, what began as a fairy tale marriage turned into years of a nightmare filled with real abuse, terror and victimization. The relief Myra felt after breaking free from a relationship of abuse was a turning point as she embarked on a mission to save the lives of domestic violence victims and offer them hope. Her activism eventually led to the launching of the first ever National Domestic Violence Registry (NDVR). Now, Myra and a team of people across the country have created a movement to comprehensively tackle the domestic violence epidemic around the United States and work with legislatures and activists to draw the connection to those with a history of violence in their past through the efforts of NDVR.

In 2009, Myra also won the Gerald I. Lamkin Innovation & Entrepreneurship Center’s Award from the Society of Innovators of Northwest Indiana for her creation of NDVR and holds a lifetime membership with the Society of Innovators.

Tune in Tuesday, July 12th at 9 PM Eastern, 6pm Pacific to www.party934.com, 94.9 FM Hudson Valley, NY to hear domestic violence activist Myra Spearman and learn more about the need for the comprehensive approach of NDVR toward the issue of domestic violence.

http://www.jazzpdx.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/adf1367-insert-jdmp001-293x300.jpgFeaturing the music of ELIANE AMHERD, singer, guitarist and songwriter, from her album Now and From Now On

Eliane is one of the hottest forces of the New York City Jazz, Brazilian and Latin scene. The Swiss-born singer, guitarist and songwriter graduated from New York’s New School University for Jazz and Contemporary Music in 2000. Since then her original music and lyrics, a groovy mix of all her influences, has been creating quite a buzz.

Besides her performances as a leader or a featured artist in New York’s most famous clubs, like the Blue Note, Joe’s Pub, the Jazz Standard, Cornelia’s Street Cafe, Nuyorican Poets Cafe and major events like the Swiss Peak Festival, the reopening of the Silverstein Building at the World Trade Center (alongside Lou Reed, Susan Vega, and the Brazilian Girls), she also tours in North- and South America, Canada, Europe and Asia, where she performed at the Beijing Jazz Festival in China and the Giant Steppes of Jazz Festival in Mongolia.

Eliane worked with greats such as Randy Brecker, Marcus Strickland, Marc Ribot, Michael Carvin, Bill Ware, Jovino Santos Neto etc. She plays guitar in the Pacha Massive video “don’t let go” on MTV, her song “as If” can be heard in the award winning movie “Approaching Union Square” by filmmaker Marc Meyers and her voice is featured on Jeremy Mage’s song “Slippery Light” appearing on the NBC hit TV series “Lipstick Jungle”. Eliane also arranged and produced the Swiss Miss Sampler ÒheimwehÓ, featuring famous Swiss artists like Eliana Burki, Nubya, Gigi Moto, Mia Aegerter etc. This recording has earned her many great press reviews, several interviews on Swiss national radio stations and an appearance on the popular Swiss talk show “Aeschbacher”.

Her own band consists of the best musicians the city has to offer, like the two female bass players Jennifer Vincent and Hagar Ben Ari, bass player Gustavo Amarante and the drummers Willard Dyson and Abou Diarrassouba. Other accomplished musicians you can catch on stage with Eliane are: drummers or percussionists Ze Mauricio, Genji Siriasi, Sylvia Cuenca, bass players Ray Parker, Yoshi Waki, Itaiguara, pianists Rachel Z, Helen Sung, Chris Wiesendanger and many others. ElianePerforms.com

For more information about Eliane, visit www.elianeperforms.com.

The Call for More Men

by Lyn Twyman 

Recently I had the opportunity to co-present a workshop at the National Organization for Women’s (NOW) annual conference in Tampa, FL. The workshop was about how survivors of domestic violence could be resilient after experiencing abuse. I shared my own personal story of resiliency, what that means for me as a survivor of child abuse and intimate partner violence, and coping techniques. After my presentation, participants in the workshop shared their experiences and their own heartfelt stories of triumph over abuse.

During the entire NOW conference, hundreds of feminist women, and men, gathered during that weekend to discuss issues affecting women and families in this country and around the world. Men like Barry Goldstein, activist and battered mothers advocate, and Ben Atherton-Zeman, spokesperson of the National Organization for Men Against Sexism, only to name a few, represented that segment of male society who fight for the equality of women, protection of children, and the declination of the age old, destructive misogynist ways of thinking. They were welcomed speakers among a sea of activist women.

Whether you agree with all that NOW as an organization represents, one thing I saw was their ability to engage men in the conversation of solutions to ensure a progressive future for both women. All movements start from one point but in order to be sustainable, they must be willing to adapt and grow into a progressive effort that meets the needs of society in modern times. Among many great initiatives, that is one initiative NOW is managing to do.

Often when we talk about social ills like domestic violence, sexual assault and child abuse, we speak in terms of how they affect women. And women are often the ones to carry the torch to create support and resources for survivors. There are more women representing these issues too like there are women flooding church pews. There is an overwhelming unleveled scale of women compared to men on these serious issues that require the participation of men, the imperative engagement of men both young and old.

If we want to see a drastic shift take place in the way society views domestic violence, sexual assault and child abuse, men can no longer be side line participants in the conversations and there must be an active recruitment to engage well intentioned men to ally alongside women who have taken these issues by the bridle to see effectual change take place.

We also need to pay closer attention to how misogyny has damaged men and has failed male victims. The misperception that as a man you should tough it up if you are assaulted, or that you can just take it and move on has drove countless men to live lives that are less than fulfilling, lives filled with denial, depression, addiction, abuse and yes, like many women re-victimization. We also do ourselves a disservice when we alienate men from our lives, when we fail to acknowledge their role in helping to create solutions. We also poison our posterity when we allow rhetoric and misogynist imagery to permeate our mainstream society, from both men and women, and do nothing about. I am talking about the men and women who portray both sexes like nothing more than sexual objects.

There are many men that want to get involved and fight alongside women to help bring change, despite what negative they have been taught by their fathers or society. Unfortunately some of them have been turned away by women who failed to recognize the need for change and allow men to take part in the solution with programs and services.

So take the time to look at your work and find ways to increase the engagement and participation of men. Men are a vital part of the equation to solving women’s issues and issues that are perceived to be just women’s issues. There are countless positive, inspiring, spirit filled men out there that are crusaders for protection and seekers of justice. The issues that often begin with female victims affect all of us. So be a part of that progressive change and embrace the men who raise their hands and ask, ‘How can I as a man help?’

Lyn Twyman is Founder of Courage Network and the host of the weekly radio show Courage Empowerment Forum. Lyn is also the Deputy Director of the National Domestic Violence Registry.

Archive Press Release: Lyn Twyman Takes Part in Annual National Organization of Women (NOW) Conference

Lyn Twyman Takes Part in Annual National Organization of Women (NOW) Conference

Posted by ⋅ 06/24/2011 ⋅ Leave a Comment

Building Resiliency and Economic Empowerment for Survivors of Domestic Violence

 

Lyn Twyman, Founder of Courage Network and Deputy Director of the National Domestic Violence Registry was tapped to present a workshop at the annual National Organization of Women (NOW) Conference being held in Tampa, FL, June 24-26.  The theme of the 2011 conference is “Daring to Dream: Building a Feminist Future” and will be presenting attendees with many programs and workshops throughout the weekend. The workshop titled “Building Resiliency and Economic Empowerment for Survivors of Domestic Violence” will be teaching attendees why economic security is a safety issue for survivors of intimate partner violence and the link between poverty and violence.

One out of three women experiences domestic abuse in their lifetimes, and their healing depends on having their emotional, mental and psychological needs met. Motivational techniques for healing will be shared. This workshop will explain how you can apply these tools when working with survivors. Also, learn how to assist survivors in career planning by providing them with resources on higher-paying nontraditional jobs and opportunities in the green economy.

Presenting along with Lyn Twyman is Allen Thomas.  Allen is a progressive advocate who works on issues related to domestic violence such as the affects of family violence on children,the role substance abuse plays in family violence, victims’ rights, crime reduction in communities, gang violence, juvenile violence and healthy relationships. Allen founded Operation Freedom NC, a grassroots volunteer organization that has grown into a community, state‐wide and national effort with a team of dedicated volunteers. The organization was founded after Allen chose to take his pain from the murder of his mother to help others avoid becoming victims of domestic violence. The mission of Operation Freedom NC is to raise awareness and prevention of domestic violence in local communities throughout the State of North Carolina and across the country. Allen is also the recipient of the 2010 Secretary’s Award of Excellence from North CarolinaDepartment of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention in the field of community service.  www.operationfreedomnc.org

Lyn is an advocate, activist, consultant and entertainment producer. A survivor of child abuse and domestic violence, she founded CourageNetwork.com, a progressive online community for domestic violence survivors and organizations. She is also the Deputy Director of the National Domestic Violence Registry, a model program founded in 2007 by Myra Spearman. Lyn is passionate about ending domestic violence, diversity issues, and the family. She is a talk radio personality on Party934.com, 94.9 FM Hudson Valley, NY, producing and directing her program called Courage Empowerment Forum where she discusses domestic violence, crime victimization and other social issues affecting communities, along with featured music. Lyn has lobbied for The International Violence Against Women Act on Capital Hill and has been a featured guest on several media outlets. Lyn has also worked on several independent film projects and is currently teamed with two award winning directors producing both a feature film and co‐producing a civil rights documentary about the life of Joan Mulholland.  www.lyntwyman.com

For more information about the NOW Conference schedule, please visit their website: http://www.now.org/organization/conference/2011/workshops.html#4

The Role of Perception and Women: Courage Empowerment Forum Welcomes Author, Educator and Musical Artist Russel Blake

Media plays a major role in the way people are perceived, especially Black Women. But long before modern media, the perception of Black Women, according to Russel Blake, has been “the long-standing root of our barometer of existence, and at the very least the heart of any discussion of constructive engagement for us to survive as a people.”

Russel Blake, Educator/Professional Musician/Concert
Soloist/Music Producer and now Author of Proverbs 31: The Virtuous Black Woman, addresses the value of Black Women in poetic pros, expressing the respect and dignity that men should have for Black Women and all women.

Russel is also a highly accomplished jazz soloist, having performed with Masakela, Cybil Shepherd, Chaka Khan, Harry Belafonte, El Gran Combo, Wynton Marsalis, Dee Dee, and many more. His latest musical work and CD is Fierce Solitude.

“Among his highest achievements was his appointment by the U.S. State Department to perform as an Ambassador of Goodwill to Eight West African Nation’s, and was also contracted by the U.S. Department of Defense to lecture on the symbiotic nature of Science and Music for DARPA’s (Defense Advanced Research Agency) Conference.” Additionally, Russel is a speaker of the reknown Smiley Group, Inc.

For more information about Russel, visit www.russelblake.net.

Tune in Tuesday, June 28th at 9 PM Eastern, 6pm Pacific to www.party934.com, 94.9 FM Hudson Valley, NY to hear this amazing pro-woman, spiritual author, educator, and jazz bassist Russel Blake.

http://www.jazzpdx.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/adf1367-insert-jdmp001-293x300.jpg

We will be featuring the music of Russel Blake during the hour broadcast!

You can listen to previous broadcasts of Courage Empowerment Forum by, visitingwww.courageempowermentforum.com

Join Courage Empowerment Forum on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Courage-Empowerment-Forum-Party934-Radio/189361497744391?v=wall

also on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/courageempower

A Voice for the Innocent: Courage Empowerment Forum Welcomes True Crime Author and Crime Novelist Diane Fanning

For some of us, the inspiration to do something comes from a motivation of a role model. In the case of Diane Fanning, a frightening and near abduction of herself at the age of 9 set a “lifelong interest in the psychology of the criminal mind.”

A winner of the University of Illinois’s Defenders of the Innocent Award for her book about a Texas serial killer that helped exonerate Julie Rea of Lawrenceville, Diane has become a highly accomplished and well respected crime author. The author of over a dozen books, Diane continues to draw readers not only interested in mystery and crime, but readers in search for real justice.

Her latest book MOMMY’S LITTLE GIRL recounts the life and death of 2 year old Caylee Anthony. It’s available at all online and local book retailers.  Diane has recently been featured on TruTv, Justice with Judge Jeanine Pirro, The Joy Behar Show, and several talk radio shows around the country covering the Casey Anthony Trial.

For more information on Diane and her books, please visit her website: www.dianefanning.com  Diane’s personal coverage of the Casey Anthony trial can be seen each day on her blog Writing is a Crime

Tune in Tuesday, June 21st at 9 PM Eastern, 6pm Pacific to www.party934.com, 94.9 FM Hudson Valley, NY to hear award-winning crime author Diane Fanning.

You can listen to previous broadcasts of Courage Empowerment Forum by, visitingwww.courageempowermentforum.com

Join Courage Empowerment Forum on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Courage-Empowerment-Forum-Party934-Radio/189361497744391?v=wall

also on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/courageempower